Sudan and Yemen are the most affected Arabs in staggering proportions

773 million suffer from illiteracy around the world

2020-09-13 | Since 1 Month

773 million young people and adults lack basic skills in reading and writing, and nearly 617 million children and adolescents lack minimum proficiency levels in reading and numeracy, according to the United Nations website.

Despite the high numbers of these numbers, many countries were able to reach 0% of illiteracy, while Arab countries are still trying to limit their high rates, in light of wars and conflicts.

The International Literacy Day is considered an annual opportunity in which countries develop plans to raise the level of education and increase its opportunities. Let us introduce you to the causes of illiteracy and its spread in the countries of the world.


Illiteracy .. its definition and causes
Illiteracy is defined as the inability to read and write. There are many reasons for it, the most important of which is the lack of awareness of the importance of learning among people, and the spread of old and backward customs that deny girls their right to education, or take them out of school when they reach a certain age, or to marry them.

The lack of interest by governments in some sectors of education is also considered a major cause of the spread of illiteracy, which leads to a gradual withdrawal of students from education and schools.

The poverty that many societies suffer from prevents many parents from sending their children to schools, due to the high costs of school tools, and the quality of school equipment required to register a child today in school has become depleting a large proportion of the family income per student, in addition to the costs of registration, from Securing, photographing, and the private lessons some students may need.

All this prompted the countries of the world to unite and proclaim the International Day to Combat Illiteracy, and to deal with its causes to eradicate it, and to provide ways of learning for all.

International Literacy Day
After holding the fourteenth session of its General Conference, on October 26, 1966, UNESCO declared September 8 of each year the International Literacy Day. To this day, this day is still celebrated with the aim of reminding the international community of the importance of literacy, as a matter of human dignity and respect for human rights, and emphasizing the need to intensify efforts towards reaching societies more literate with literacy skills.

The International Literacy Day is celebrated with the aim of reminding the international community of the importance of reading for individuals and societies, and to intensify efforts exerted to reach societies more literate with literacy skills.

Where governments and civil society organizations discuss improvements in literacy rates over the past year, and think about the remaining challenges that must be addressed. The United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals also focus on ensuring access to quality education and learning opportunities for all ages. Also, one of the goals of sustainable development is to ensure that young people are taught the necessary skills in reading, writing and numeracy, and to provide opportunities to acquire them among adults who do not have them.

Countries in the world that suffer from illiteracy the most
Despite the annual celebrations, plans and goals set annually, the information chart issued by the UNESCO Institute for Statistics in 2013 indicates that 52% of 774 million illiterate people aged 15 years and over reside in West and South Asia.

Further analysis of UNESCO statistics also shows that of the 774 million illiterate adults who were registered in 2013, two-thirds of these, or about 493 million, are women who are unable or face difficulties in reading text messages, filling out forms and reading a doctor's prescription.

Moreover, there are 123 million people between the ages of 15 and 24 who cannot read or write. Among these illiterate youth, there are 76 million women and 54 million of them are in just 9 countries: India, Pakistan, Nigeria, Ethiopia, Bangladesh, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the United Republic of Tanzania, Egypt and Burkina Faso.


Most Arab countries suffer from illiteracy
Statistics from the Arab Organization for Education, Culture and Science (ALECSO) for the year 2018 showed that illiteracy rates in Arab countries reached 21%, which is higher than the global average, which is 13.6%.

These numbers are also subject to increase in light of the crises and armed conflicts that some Arab countries suffer. Approximately 13.5 million Arab children have missed education due to these conditions, among dropouts and non-enrollments.

Statistics also indicate that the rate of illiteracy among males in the Arab world is around 14.6%, while among females it rises to 25.9%, and the percentage of illiterate females in a number of countries in the region ranges between 60 and 80%.

The list of Arab countries that suffer from illiteracy tops Sudan by 73%, followed by Somalia by 63%, Mauritania by 56%, and Yemen by 32%, according to World Atlas.

Countries have succeeded in completely eradicating illiteracy
It is true that there is tangible progress in the rates of education in countries all over the world, but some countries have managed to completely eliminate illiteracy, such as Andorra, Luxembourg, Norway, and Liechtenstein, where literacy reaches almost 100%.

Andorra, the country in southwestern Europe, is one such country, where 100% of its population is literate. It also enforces a law requiring all children between the ages of 6 and 16 to compulsorily attend their school systems.

The Andorran government has been able to provide free education up to the secondary level. This is in addition to allocating a percentage of the GDP to the education sector. Similar practices are observed in other countries, such as Finland, where around 7% of GDP is spent on education.


Countries are about to eradicate illiteracy
Some countries such as Azerbaijan and Cuba are seeking to completely eradicate illiteracy, and countries such as Georgia, Tajikistan, Russia, Poland and Slovenia have achieved literacy rates of 100%, or nearly 100%.

Andorra, the country in southwestern Europe, is one such country, where 100% of its population is literate. It also enforces a law requiring all children between the ages of 6 and 16 to compulsorily attend their school systems.

The Andorran government has been able to provide free education up to the secondary level. This is in addition to allocating a percentage of the GDP to the education sector. Similar practices are observed in other countries, such as Finland, where around 7% of GDP is spent on education.


Countries are about to eradicate illiteracy
Some countries such as Azerbaijan and Cuba are seeking to completely eradicate illiteracy, and countries such as Georgia, Tajikistan, Russia, Poland and Slovenia have achieved literacy rates of 100%, or nearly 100%.

In Russia, for example, it is estimated that 53% of the population there receives some form of higher education. The government believes in free education delivery systems, and the areas it places great emphasis on include science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Turning to countries like Slovakia, Turkmenistan, Uzbekistan, and Kyrgyzstan, they are very close to completely eradicating illiteracy as well. In Slovakia there are 20 state universities and 10 private universities. In fact, citizens of many of the countries that make up the former Soviet Union and the "Eastern Bloc" countries can claim to have some of the highest access to higher education opportunities in the world.



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